content strategy

STRATEGY

Five questions to ask when investing in filmed content


– If your organisation is investing in filmed content at scale, is the best investment of your time in finding the cheapest production partner, or formulating the smartest strategy?

– When you’re commissioning a filmed content project, is “how much is this going to cost?” the best way to start the conversation, or is there a smarter way?

– When you’re considering a partner for your filmed content program, is your above-the-line agency your best option, or could an agile specialist be a smarter way to go?

– When you’re thinking about what you want your filmed content to do, is “go viral” the only benchmark that matters, or are there more measures of success you should consider?

– Is going low-budget for a single-channel piece of filmed content the best way to maximise your ROI, or is an holistic approach to a program of work that considers every channel a smarter way?

Utilising our proprietary strategic framework, we can develop a content plan with stretch across channels and through tiers, which spreads your total investment over a program of content, over a period of time.
We feel this is the best way to deliver maximum value, in terms of the quality of execution, reaching and connecting with the right audience, and which provides tangible and intangible bang-for-buck.

Andrew Marsh is the principal of Marshlandia.

STRATEGY

How to make filmed content worth making.


For businesses and organisations, the demand for filmed content has grown exponentially in recent times.
But it’s a challenge to get content “right”: to meet the demand in terms of volume, but also deliver content that is relevant and valuable to audiences – and which delivers value to the client commissioning the work.
It’s a challenge compounded by a reduced degree of certainty of success, thanks to the fragmentation of the media environment and radical changes in audience behaviours, all of which places ever-increasing pressure on budgets.
So, how can you ensure the investment you make is worthwhile?
We believe the answer lies in taking an holistic approach to filmed content, underpinned by creative excellence and best-practice production methodologies.
This starts with identifying all external and internal touch-points for which video is commissioned within an organisation, and reviewing the content for quality and consistency of execution, opportunities for re-purposing, financial outlay, and the investment of time and head-hours in its creation.

Utilising our proprietary strategic framework, we then develop a plan with stretch across channels and through tiers, which spreads the total investment over a program of content, over a period of time.
We feel this is the best way to deliver maximum value, in terms of the quality of execution, reaching and connecting with the right audience, and which provides tangible and intangible bang-for-buck.
In short, it’s how we help clients make filmed content worth making.

Andrew Marsh is the principal of Marshlandia.

BETTER OUT THAN IN

Is what matters most to your brand what matters most?


Brand storytelling has always been full of “you had to be there” moments – stories with meaning to the teller, but which struggle to resonate with their intended audience.
In the traditional media environment, such failures of relevance could be offset to some degree by repetition – hammering away break-after-break at a captive audience via linear TV broadcasts; presenting your case every day in the daily newspapers; bombarding commuters on their way home with incessant radio placements.
Eventually, with deep enough pockets, a brand could figure on at least some of their messaging sinking in.
How things have changed, huh?
In the disrupted media world, with so many touchpoints and so distracted an audience, no brand can bank on repetition even happening, let alone delivering a measurable degree of effectiveness.
As we know, the power is – literally – in the hands of the audience, who have the choice to consume and share content where, when and how they want.
Or not.
In such a fickle environment, there are no ironclad guarantees of success. For every viral sensation, there are thousands of forgotten stories, often representing a large investment of time, money and hard work in their creation.
Which is why relevance is so critical when you do catch an eyeball – you might only get one shot, so you better make it count.
As marketers and creators, we owe it to the audience to make it a guiding principle that the content we deliver speaks firstly, if not solely, to what matters to them.
That probably doesn’t include a shopping list of features, a re-interpretation of divisional KPI’s, or any other internal priority that matters not one jot to the viewer, but which so often finds itself front and centre when a brand tries to connect with them.
These are the ingredients of a sure-fire “you had to be there” moment, falling flat, dead in the water at the point of delivery.
Ironically, the disruptive technologies that present so many challenges also offer unequalled opportunities for brands to get their content in front of their audience, and the tools to understand what makes them tick.
With such depth of understanding, and in collaboration with expert partners who can use it to define compelling narratives, a brand has all the tools it needs to always deliver content of genuine importance and value to the audience.
In the context of brand storytelling, we think that’s just about the only thing that matters.

Andrew Marsh is the principal of Marshlandia.